Month: June 2020

Self-Care for the Caregiver in the COVID Era with Dimitrios Tsatiris, MD

Physicians dedicate our lives to the care of others and this often doesn’t end when we leave work, but extends to our family and friends, other projects and demands that lead us to over extend ourselves until we feel like butter spread over too much bread. This has become acutely true during this pandemic, so psychiatrist Dr. Dimitrios Tsatiris discusses how we can work more self-care into our lives without the guilt. We start by defining self-care, what can happen to us if we forgo it for too long. We then go into all of the internal and external obstacles we face to self-care and he gives ideas for overcoming those obstacles.

Dimitrios Tsatiris, MD, is a Board-Certified Psychiatrist in Cleveland, Ohio, who specializes in the treatment of anxiety and mood disorders. He completed his residency training at University Hospitals Case Medical Center where he served as Chief Resident. He is also certified in psychodynamic psychotherapy from the Cleveland Psychoanalytic Center.

When he is not at work, he devotes his time to his wife and 2 young children.

He can be found on Twitter at @DrDimitriosMD

This episode is sponsored by PatternLife.com. Shopping for disability insurance can be complicated and time consuming. Wondering if you are getting the best prices and discounts while in training can make the process even more overwhelming. Pattern believes doctors have more important things to do than spend hours sorting through numerous insurance options. This is why thousands of doctors trust Pattern to help them compare and understand the insurance they are buying. They do this in three simple steps: First, request your quotes online. Second, compare your options and ask questions. And third, apply risk-free. Be confident you have the right policy so that your income is protected. With discounts for doctors in training and some relaxed requirements during COVID-19, now is truly the best time to request your disability insurance quotes with Pattern at patternlife.com/partner/pgd.

Find this and all episodes on your favorite podcast platform at PhysiciansGuidetoDoctoring.com

Please be sure to leave a five-star review, a nice comment and SHARE!!!

Nonverbal Communication from Behind the Mask with Blake Eastman

Blake Eastman is a guest like no other we’ve had. He is a professional poker player and founded School of Cards, the first brick and mortar poker school in the country and is the creator of Beyond Tells, a poker tells training site. He has a graduate degree in psychology and taught psychology at the City University of New York for six years. While he was doing that all of that, he also provided consulting services to physicians, practices, and hospitals regarding nonverbal communication and conducts large scale independent research on nonverbal communication.

The current pandemic has hamstrung our ability to read nonverbal communication and convey it. We are either behind a mask or a blurry image on a telehealth visit. He teaches us what to prioritize with regards to our own nonverbal cues, how to optimize a telehealth visit, the importance of the cadence and volume of our speech, and cues for recognizing understanding.

https://www.schoolofcards.com/

https://www.beyondtells.com/

@blakeeastman

Honest Answers About Disability Insurance with Matthew Wiggins of PatternLife.com

Matthew Wiggins is the co-founder and Senior Advisor at Pattern, a life and disability insurance company that caters specifically to the physician community. Today he teaches us about disability and despite there being a pandemic that is putting us at higher risk, because of the shelter in place orders, it is actually EASIER to get disability. We discuss this as well as why disability is so important, why he rarely sells short term disability, when it is OK to drop your policy, and the rate of disability for physicians vs. the population at large.

Mr. Wiggins has spent the past 10 years educating and advising over 6,000 physicians across the country. He has been invited to speak at many major medical training institutions such as Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic, and Johns Hopkins, and has provided educational webinars to thousands of doctors through the years. Doctors who attend these sessions say that the emphasis on what Matt calls physician “practical wellness” impacts how they view and handle searching for jobs, signing contracts, and staying on top of their personal finances.

As a full disclosure, he is a sponsor of this episode and a few others, but I didn’t pull any punches and if you are looking for social proof, just go to his website. He has the support of some of the biggest names in the physician finance space. Find him at Patternlife.com/partner/PGD.

This episode is sponsored by PatternLife.com. Shopping for disability insurance can be complicated and time consuming. Wondering if you are getting the best prices and discounts while in training can make the process even more overwhelming. Pattern believes doctors have more important things to do than spend hours sorting through numerous insurance options. This is why thousands of doctors trust Pattern to help them compare and understand the insurance they are buying. They do this in three simple steps: First, request your quotes online. Second, compare your options and ask questions. And third, apply risk-free. Be confident you have the right policy so that your income is protected. With discounts for doctors in training and some relaxed requirements during COVID-19, now is truly the best time to request your disability insurance quotes with Pattern at patternlife.com/partner/pgd.

Find this and all episodes on your favorite podcast platform at PhysiciansGuidetoDoctoring.com

Please be sure to leave a five-star review, a nice comment and SHARE!!!

Discussing Flipping the Script on Health Disparities with Max Jordan Nguemeni Tiako

This is a flashpoint in our nation’s history and our positions as physicians endow us with a certain amount of respect and authority and with that authority comes responsibility.  Responsibility to have difficult conversations. It is not uncommon for us to have difficult conversations, like breaking bad news, discussing an adverse health outcome, but these conversations are about others. We need to have difficult conversations about ourselves. We need to reflect on our own biases and how these can affect the health outcomes of our minority patients and career trajectories of our minority colleagues.

In light of current events, I have chosen to rerelease episodes from earlier this year that should be thought provoking and allow us to reflect on the ivory tower, conservative institution that is medicine and how we can help to move the needle to improve health outcomes for our minority patients and the careers of our minority colleagues. One way to improve the former, is to improve the latter. 

Max Jordan Nguemeni Tiako is a 5th year med student (out of 5) at the Yale School of Medicine and hosts his own podcast, Flip the Script, about healthcare disparities. He starts out discussing how some of what we learn about race being a risk factor for some diseases are a product of social constructs, not genetic predisposition. We then discuss racial disparities in substance-use disorder treatment. We then pivot from health disparities to physician training disparities.  We learn about the hardships faced by minority medical students from microaggressions from students and faculty to disparities in grading and how this can affect career trajectory. He ends by discussing some pearls he has learned from his own podcast.  

Mr. Tiako grew up in Yaounde, Cameroon, and moved to the US to attend Howard University, got a BS in in civil and environmental engineering and then a Masters in Bioengineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is currently doing research connecting his civil/environmental engineering background to identify elements of urban design that can be leveraged to improve health outcomes and move the needle towards health equity. His research fellowship is at the Center for Emergency Care & Policy research at the University of Pennsylvania. He spends his free time writing about racism and medical education in the medical student magazine InTraining.  

His Twitter handle: @MaxJordan_N

His podcast can be found here:

iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/flip-the-script/id1402777078

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/yaleuniversity/sets/flip-the-script

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1judlJj8gLg8OnVJtpXv7O?si=snZWGMbaRiafUfJZajHRyw

Episode Rerelease: Overcoming Our Racial Biases to Better Serve Our Patients with Dr. Uché Blackstock

This is a flashpoint in our nation’s history and our positions as physicians endow us with a certain amount of respect and authority and with that authority comes responsibility.  Responsibility to have difficult conversations. It is not uncommon for us to have difficult conversations, like breaking bad news, discussing an adverse health outcome, but these conversations are about others. We need to have difficult conversations about ourselves. We need to reflect on our own biases and how these can affect the health outcomes of our minority patients and career trajectories of our minority colleagues.

In light of current events, I have chosen to rerelease episodes from earlier this year that should be thought provoking and allow us to reflect on the ivory tower, conservative institution that is medicine and how we can help to move the needle to improve health outcomes for our minority patients and the careers of our minority colleagues. One way to improve the former, is to improve the latter. 

Dr. Uché Blackstock is an emergency medicine physician who is passionate about addressing the detrimental effects of structural racism on health outcomes. We discuss the origins of structural racism and how this continues to influence the health outcomes of minorities. She then gives us some tools for reflecting on our own biases and how we can work to address them. In addition to patient care, we talk about improving the diversity of faculty, and the importance of mentorship and sponsorship. We end by discussing something each of us can start doing tomorrow in order to address our own biases.

Dr. Blackstock went to Harvard for both undergrad and medical school, did her emergency medicine residency at SUNY Downstate/ King’s County Hospital Center and then a fellowship in ultrasound at St. Luke’s Roosevelt.  She recently left her position as associate professor at NYU as well as the faculty director of recruitment, retention and inclusion at the office of diversity affairs at the medical school to focus entirely on her company Advancing Health Equity, which aims to partner with healthcare organizations to address some of the critical factors that contribute to health inequity, through educational trainings and racial equity culture analytics.  She can be found at advancinghealthequity.com and on Twitter @dr_uche_bee.

The implicit bias test that she discussed can be found here: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html

#BLM #BlackLivesMatter