Month: August 2020

Doctor, You’ve Been Served (Not in a Dance-Off), Part 2, with Gita Pensa, MD

This is part 2 of 2 of my discussion with Dr. Gita Pensa, emergency medicine physician and host of the educational podcast, “Doctors and Litigation: The L Word”, a narrative-style series about psychological and practical preparation for malpractice litigation.  We continue the discussion about how deposition is an audition for the trial and how important it is the play the part of the doctor everyone would want, not an arrogant physician who feels they know the medicine better than everyone.  At trial, your goal is the be the caring, compassionate, knowledgeable doctor that the jury would want as their doctor. And what in the world does dancing have to do with her trial? We also discussed how this influenced her practice and how she got back to loving medicine again.

Dr. Gita Pensa is an Associate Professor with the Brown University Emergency Medicine Residency. She joined Brown’s academic faculty in 2014, after thirteen years in community emergency medicine practice. In 2015, she launched Brown EM’s educational blog as well as the Brown EM podcast series. She created and serves as host/editor of AEM Early Access, a collaborative podcasting project from the Academic Emergency Medicine journal and the Brown EM residency. Dr. Pensa is Associate Director of Brown’s Emergency Digital Health Innovation program, and co-developed Brown’s new Digital Health and Innovation fellowship program.

Find her on Twitter at @GitaPensaMD

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Doctor, You’ve Been Served (Not in a Dance-Off), Part 1, with Gita Pensa, MD

Dr. Gita Pensa is an Associate Professor with the Brown University Emergency Medicine Residency. She joined Brown’s academic faculty in 2014, after thirteen years in community emergency medicine practice. In 2015, she launched Brown EM’s educational blog as well as the Brown EM podcast series. She created and serves as host/editor of AEM Early Access, a collaborative podcasting project from the Academic Emergency Medicine journal and the Brown EM residency. Dr. Pensa is Associate Director of Brown’s Emergency Digital Health Innovation program, and co-developed Brown’s new Digital Health and Innovation fellowship program.

We start out discussing her decade long lawsuit and how this affected her psyche, her practice, and her marriage.  Victor Frankl would be proud as she turned her tumultuous experience into a way to help others through an extremely well executed, engaging, and educational podcast, “Doctors and Litigation: The L Word”. It is a narrative-style series about the psychological and practical preparation for malpractice litigation, and she speaks nationally on the topic of malpractice litigation. We talk about whether we’d be willing to be friends with a personal injury attorney and her answer was surprising. However, expert witnesses are a different story. Unfounded lawsuits couldn’t happen without them, and they are supposedly one of us. If you are named in a lawsuit, we discuss all the players and how to comport yourself to improve your outcome. Theatrics often trump the medicine in this situation.

Find her on twitter at @GitaPensaMD

Find this and all episodes on your favorite podcast platform at PhysiciansGuidetoDoctoring.com

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Size Matters Not: Tiny Habits for Big Changes, Part 2, with BJ Fogg, PhD

This is part 2 of my interview with Dr. BJ Fogg, author of Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything. In this part, we talk about how success breeds success and having your patient work on the habit you want them to change shouldn’t be the first priority. The first priority should be what they want to change because it shows them that they can be successful in creating lasting change. We also discuss how positive emotions help to encode habits and he actually came up with a technique to make ourselves feel successful after we’ve performed an act we want to repeat. We end by talking about the habits that he is still working on himself.

If you have questions for Dr. Fogg, please email me at brad@physiciansguidetodoctoring.com as he has agreed to do another interview with crowdsourced questions from physicians. He can be found at BJFogg.com and TinyHabits.com.

Dr. Fogg founded the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University. In addition to his research, Dr. Fogg teaches industry innovators how human behavior really works. He created the Tiny Habits Academy to help people around the world and interestingly, the Tiny Habits Academy long preceded the Tiny Habits book. He lives in Northern California and Maui.

Find this and all episodes on your favorite podcast platform at PhysiciansGuidetoDoctoring.com

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Size Matters Not: Tiny Habits for Big Changes with BJ Fogg, PhD

This interview is one of my most important. If you are doing to share any of my episodes, this is one that I would implore you to share with your friends, family and colleagues. This is part 1 of 2 of my interviews with BJ Fogg, PhD, author of the book Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything. We all struggle to change our behaviors, to develop good habits and stop bad habits. There is a lot of popular wisdom about this and most, if not all, is just wrong. This is where Dr. Fogg steps in.

Dr. Fogg discovered the keys to changing behavior through changing habits. For those of you on medical school faculty, this should be a class. This should actually be taught in high school. Until then, as physicians, this information is critical, not just for lifestyle changes that can help patients eat better, move more, and smoke less, but even applies to checking their blood pressure and taking their medication. Popular wisdom is wrong. Guilt and shame are destructive. People don’t start habits by feeling badly, they start habits by feeling successful. And we are more likely to be successful by starting a habit that is small, that we actually want to do, and the third key to this is a prompt that reminds you it is time to perform the behavior. If you are going to learn piano, you start with chopsticks. If you are going to start to exercise, you do one sit-up. The smallest increment that you can fall back on when you motivation is waning so you don’t fall off the wagon completely and you keep your habit. And you do it at a point in your day that you can associate with the new behavior, even if they are completely unrelated. You’ll have a reminder that is baked into your day.

Dr. Fogg founded the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University. In addition to his research, Dr. Fogg teaches industry innovators how human behavior really works. He created the Tiny Habits Academy to help people around the world and interestingly, the Tiny Habits Academy long preceded the Tiny Habits book. He lives in Northern California and Maui.

This is Part 1. Part 2 will be out next week. He was kind enough to already offer another interview, so if you have any questions, please email them to me at Brad@physiciansguidetodoctoring.com

He can be found at BJFOGG.com and tinyhabits.com

What Our Allied Health Colleagues Want Us to Know with Andrew Tisser, DO

Andrew Tisser DO is an emergency physician and urgent care director practicing in Western NY. Andrew’s passion is to help fellow early-career physicians navigate the issues of money, mindset and making moves (goal setting). He hosts the Talk2MeDoc podcast and is the owner of Talk2MeDoc LLC, a consulting company working with early-career physicians on the above. His original podcast goal was to get different allied health professionals onto the show to discuss what they wanted physicians to know about their fields and what we could do to foster better communication. On today’s show we discuss the takeaway from a few of his more memorable episodes, covering the security personal, nurses, physical therapists, lab technicians, pharmacists and more. There were common themes throughout the interviews that we discuss. He has since pivoted to focusing his podcast on issues relevant to early career physicians. He can be found at AndrewTisserDO.com

 Dr. Tisser is a loving husband to his wife Alysia [pronounced ALEESHA] and proud dog dad to Lillie, a 9 year old shepherd/collie mix. You can find him at https://andrewtisserdo.com

Twitter: @talk2medoc

FB: Andrew tisser and talk2medoc consulting

LinkedIn: @andrewtisserdo

IG: @talk2medocpodcast

Find this and all episodes on your favorite podcast platform at PhysiciansGuidetoDoctoring.com

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