Month: October 2021

Motivational Interviewing in the Vaccine Hesitant with Joseph Weiner, MD, Ph.D., Part 2

I’m re-releasing this episode because of how critical it is. In my quest to be taught how best to have a fruitful discussion with those hesitant about the vaccine, I interviewed two science communicators, a social engineer, a lawyer, an expert in cognitive biases, and a motivational interview and of all of those, the last one was the most powerful tool for moving the needle on those hesitant to get the vaccine.  Motivational interviewing comes from addiction medicine, but using it for vaccine hesitancy actually precedes the COVID pandemic. It is used for new parents who are considering forgoing their newborns’ vaccines. Mandates are going to get some to get the vaccine, but for others, a conversation with their trusted physician can be a powerful thing. Dr. Joseph Weiner teaches us how to use it to help our patients with vaccination and other decisions.  Dr. Joseph Weiner is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Medicine and Science Education at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, where he co-directs the four-year curriculum in Physician-Patient Communication and Interpersonal Skills. Thinking and writing about how patients and clinicians communicate with each other has been a major interest in his career. This episode is sponsored by CompHealth Just head to financialresidency.com/comphealth and see what locums can do for you financially.

Motivational Interviewing in the Vaccine Hesitant with Joseph Weiner, MD, Ph.D., Part 1

I’m re-releasing this episode because of how critical it is. In my quest to be taught how best to have a fruitful discussion with those hesitant about the vaccine, I interviewed two science communicators, a social engineer, a lawyer, an expert in cognitive biases, and a motivational interview and of all of those, the last one was the most powerful tool for moving the needle on those hesitant to get the vaccine.  Motivational interviewing comes from addiction medicine, but using it for vaccine hesitancy actually precedes the COVID pandemic. It is used for new parents who are considering forgoing their newborns’ vaccines. Mandates are going to get some to get the vaccine, but for others, a conversation with their trusted physician can be a powerful thing. Dr. Joseph Weiner teaches us how to use it to help our patients with vaccination and other decisions.  Dr. Joseph Weiner is an Associate Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Medicine and Science Education at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, where he co-directs the four-year curriculum in Physician-Patient Communication and Interpersonal Skills. Thinking and writing about how patients and clinicians communicate with each other has been a major interest in his career. This episode is sponsored by CompHealth Just head to financialresidency.com/comphealth and see what locums can do for you financially.

Learn to Make Your Patients Laugh with Scott Dikkers of The Onion

Last month marked the 20th anniversary of 9/11. Two weeks later, The Onion, the famed comedy newspaper, put out an issue with jokes about 9/11. How did they do that? Scott Dikkers, one of The Onion’s founders teaches us how. His rule is that comedy is meant to “afflict the comfortable and comfort the afflicted.” That’s why they put out that issue. To comfort the afflicted. Mr. Dikkers teaches comedy writing and has turned what seems unteachable into a science. He has described funny filters and all comedy fits into one of those filters. He teaches us which are the best for the exam room, how to recover from a failed joke, how to work humor into our office visits and lectures, and what jokes comedians can’t use, but we can!   Scott Dikkers founded the world’s first humor website, TheOnion.com, in 1996. A few years earlier he helped found the original Onion newspaper. He’s served as The Onion’s owner and editor-in-chief, on and off, for much of the last quarter century.  He led The Onion’s rise from small, unknown college humor publication to internationally respected comedy brand.  He is also a New York Times best seller, and Peabody Award winner.  He documented his process for creating humor in his book, How to Write Funny, and the second in the series, How to Write Funnier, and next on the way, How to Write Funniest, which are the basis of the Writing with The Onion program he created and teaches at The Second City Training Center in Chicago. Scott offers other courses and free resources for comedy writers on the How to Write Funny website. Today’s sponsor is CompHealth. To find out more visit financialresidency.com/comphealth 

Harness the Power of Language When Discussing Weight with Stephanie Sogg, PhD

This was one of my favorite interviews. I was a fledgling podcaster at the time when I interviewed, Dr. Stephanie Sogg, a clinical psychologist at the Harvard Weight Center. She had been quoted in an article in the Huffington Post that lambasted physicians for not knowing how to talk to our patients about their weight. Interviews like this were the reason why I started podcasting. I emailed her and asked her if she could teach us the right way to have these discussions and she agreed!

Talking to patients about their weight is fraught with landmines created by inordinately complex psychosocial issues. It is very easy to alienate a patient. Dr. Sogg teaches us the power of language and this has come up in other interviews since. Changing racial language from minority to minoritize and slave to enslaved changes the perspective of the listener. It subtly influences how that person is perceived. The same applies to discussing weight; when we change our language about body habitus to be less stigmatizing, it subtly influences the listener, be it our patients, students or colleagues. We also need to change the way we talk about food. According to Dr. Sogg, the only bad food has gone bad, tastes bad or is poisonous.

Dr. Stephanie Sogg is a clinical psychologist and an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. She has treated patients with obesity at the MGH Weight Center since 2003. Dr. Sogg earned her PhD in clinical psychology from Rutgers University in 1998, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship with Harvard Medical School. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Sogg conducts research on obesity and bariatric surgery, and the intersection between obesity and addiction, and has published widely on obesity and related topics. She is an author of the Boston Interview for Bariatric Surgery, and of the official ASMBS Recommendations for the Pre-Surgical Psychosocial Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Patients. She is the director of the Weight Center rotation for Behavioral Medicine psychology interns, and is active in national and international scientific obesity and weight loss surgery societies. She is currently serving as a member-at-large on the Integrated Health Executive Council for the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery.

Today’s sponsor is Locumstory. You can find out more by visiting: www.locumstory.com 

Don’t Make Vertigo a Dizzying Diagnostic Dilemma

This episode is going to flip the script. I’m going to be the one interviewed. I was interviewed by Dr. Indu Partha, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tuscon, on her podcast, The Ajo Way, Primary Care Pearls from South Campus. We talked about dizziness. If you are an otolaryngologist like me, you can stop listening now, but for everyone else who finds dizziness to be mystifying, this will be a good primer to understanding otologic causes of dizziness. We aren’t getting granular here; no need to differentiate the saccule from the utricle. You’re getting lost in the weeds. If you have trouble differentiating postural dizziness from positional vertigo, this episode is for you. 

Don’t Make Vertigo a Dizzying Diagnostic Dilemma

This episode is going to flip the script. I’m going to be the one interviewed. I was interviewed by Dr. Indu Partha, Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Tuscon, on her podcast, The Ajo Way, Primary Care Pearls from South Campus. We talked about dizziness. If you are an otolaryngologist like me, you can stop listening now, but for everyone else who finds dizziness to be mystifying, this will be a good primer to understanding otologic causes of dizziness. We aren’t getting granular here; no need to differentiate the saccule from the utricle. You’re getting lost in the weeds. If you have trouble differentiating postural dizziness from positional vertigo, this episode is for you.