Month: December 2021

Pt 2 : Private Equity: Savior or Existential Threat with Otolaryngologists Drs. William Blythe and Drew Locandro

In many situations, when private equity comes calling, the owners of the practice are close to retirement and they are offered more money than they’d ever get from another physician buying into the practice. My practice has been approached by private equity twice. I’m in my early 40s, so the decision to sell is a lot more complicated. We didn’t ultimately sell, but while negotiations were taking place, I was concerned, but wasn’t sure if my concerns were valid or if I was even considering the issues I should be concerned about.   Private equity was recently a topic of discussion on ENT Connect, the American Academy of Otolaryngology’s chatroom, so I invited two of physicians who had given eloquent, concise arguments for and against selling onto the show to discuss their reasoning. It made for a very informative conversation.    William R. Blythe, MD, is a General Otolaryngologist practicing at East Alabama Ear, Nose, and Throat in Auburn/Opelika, Alabama.  He’s been in the same practice with the same partners since finishing residency in 1997.  He was the past Chief of Staff of East Alabama Health, where he served in almost every medical staff leadership position over the past 24 years. He served as President of the Alabama Society of Otolaryngology for ten years, and continued in his role as Annual Meeting Coordinator.  He continues to serve on multiple committees for AAO-HNS, including CPT, AMPC, Reg-ENT Executive Committee and is currently the Senior Director for Private Practice, Board of Directors, and BOD Executive Committee.   Drew Locandro, MD, is a practicing general otolaryngologist with Northwest ENT and Allergy – Marietta, Georgia. He joined a group practice thereafter residency in Albany NY and has practiced there since. He is president of his 6-physician group with 5 office locations and an ASC. He’s served as chairman of the department of surgery at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital as well as chair of the hospital quality assurance committee for several years. He’s also been a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Outcomes Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Committees. Today’s Sponsor is Locumstory: To find out more visit: https://www.doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory

Part 1: Private Equity: Savior or Existential Threat with Otolaryngologists Drs. William Blythe and Drew Locandro

In many situations, when private equity comes calling, the owners of the practice are close to retirement and they are offered more money than they’d ever get from another physician buying into the practice. My practice has been approached by private equity twice. I’m in my early 40s, so the decision to sell is a lot more complicated. We didn’t ultimately sell, but while negotiations were taking place, I was concerned, but wasn’t sure if my concerns were valid or if I was even considering the issues I should be concerned about.   Private equity was recently a topic of discussion on ENT Connect, the American Academy of Otolaryngology’s chatroom, so I invited two of physicians who had given eloquent, concise arguments for and against selling onto the show to discuss their reasoning. It made for a very informative conversation.    William R. Blythe, MD, is a General Otolaryngologist practicing at East Alabama Ear, Nose and Throat in Auburn/Opelika, Alabama.  He’s been in the same practice with the same partners since finishing residency in 1997.  He was the past Chief of Staff of East Alabama Health, where he served in almost every medical staff leadership position over the past 24 years. He served as President of the Alabama Society of Otolaryngology for ten years, and continued in his role as Annual Meeting Coordinator.  He continues to serve on multiple committees for AAO-HNS, including CPT, AMPC, Reg-ENT Executive Committee, and is currently the Senior Director for Private Practice, Board of Directors and BOD Executive Committee.   Drew Locandro, MD, is a practicing general otolaryngologist with Northwest ENT and Allergy – Marietta, Georgia. He joined a group practice there after residency in Albany NY and has practiced there since. He is president of his 6-physician group with 5 office locations and an ASC. He’s served as chairman of the department of surgery at Wellstar Kennestone Hospital as well as chair of the hospital quality assurance committee for several years. He’s also been a member of the American Academy of Otolaryngology Outcomes Research and Evidence Based Medicine Committees.   Today’s Sponsor is Locumstory. Find your next Locums assignment here: www.financialresidency.com/locumstory

Can Venture Capital Give You Tinnitus with Navin Goyal, MD, of LOUD Capital

Navin Goyal, M.D. is a physician and entrepreneur who serves as CEO of LOUD Capital, an early-stage venture capital and alternative investment firm leveraging capital, entrepreneurship, and education to grow impactful companies across the globe. Bringing his physician training to do good for people, Navin strives to make venture capital more purpose-driven, inclusive, and impactful. Before co-founding LOUD Capital, Navin practiced anesthesiology in a large hospital-based setting and was the Medical Director of a community hospital for several years. The beginning of his entrepreneurial journey was co-founding OFFOR Health (formerly SmileMD), a venture-backed mobile healthcare company that expands access to care across the United States with a dedicated focus on lower-income and rural communities. His story, his experience, and what he sees as an opportunity for physicians to have a broader impact on themselves and society is the focus of his book, Physician Underdog. Navin received his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and trained in anesthesiology at the University of Chicago Medical Center. We discuss his journey from the OR to the board room, how the grass is actually greener after leaving medicine, why we need to dig our well before we are thirsty and by thirsty, I mean stagnating or burnt out, why venture capital funds aren’t as risky as I thought, and how to pick a fund for investing.   Today’s Sponsor is Locumstory. Find your next Locums assignment here: www.financialresidency.com/locumstory

Confidently Opine as a Medical Expert Witnesses with Amy Fogelman, MD

Amy G. Fogelman, MD is Board Certified in Internal Medicine with 17 years of experience seeing patients at ambulatory practices in the Boston area. She went to med school at BU and stayed in Boston for her internal medicine residency at Beth Israel. She did a chief year in Primary Care at the VA Hospital in West Roxbury. She has been awarded prizes in clinical excellence and leadership at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH).    While consulting for personal injury and medical malpractice firms in the Boston area, Dr. Fogelman noticed a void in the consulting field, which her consulting firm, MED LAW, seeks to fill. MED LAW Consulting, LLC uses this Primary Care model, where Dr. Fogelman serves as the litigator’s own personal medical expert for the entire case as if the lawyer had an in-house physician on staff and now she teaches. In 2020, she began formally advising medical professionals on the ins-and-outs of medical expert witness work and even has a course.  We discuss common misconceptions among physicians about this type of work, how to get started, how to avoid screwing up your first few cases, the compensation and why one should avoid just doing defense work.  Today’s Sponsor is Locumstory. You can find out more by visiting: https://www.financialresidency.com/locumstory 

Hacking the Placebo Effect with Luana Colloca, MD, PhD, MS

Luana Colloca, MD, Ph.D., MS, is a physician-scientist, professor at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, Director of the TL1 program, Chair of the Pain and Placebo Special Interest Group for the International Association for Study of Pain Society (IASP), and steering member and treasurer for the Society for Interdisciplinary Studies of Placebo (SIPS). Prof. Colloca holds an MD, a Ph.D. in Neuroscience, and a masters in Bioethics.   She completed a post-doc training at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and a senior research fellowship at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, USA.  Prof. Colloca received several prestigious awards such as the IASP Wall Patrick Award for basic research on pain mechanisms. Prof Colloca leads an NIH-funded research portfolio on endogenous pain modulation including placebo/nocebo effects and other nonpharmacological interventions such as virtual reality at the School of Nursing, University of Maryland, Baltimore.    We talk about the placebo effect and its evil twin, the nocebo effect, and the dicey ethical territory that comes with recommending an intervention that you know only works if the placebo effect occurs. We also discuss the ethical dilemma of the nocebo effect, in which we prime patients to feel more pain by warning them about impending pain. Today’s Sponsor is Locumstory. For more information visit: doctorpodcastnetwork.com/locumstory