Month: February 2022

Defining Informed Consent, Capacity, and Competence with Melanie Heniff, MD, JD

Melanie Heniff, MD, JD, is Chicago native and obtained her MD from Rush Medical College in Chicago before completing a combined residency program in Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.   She is triple boarded in Emergency Medicine, General Pediatrics, and Pediatric Emergency Medicine. She recently obtained her JD from Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law and is currently an Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine and partner in Boone County Emergency Medicine.   Today’s discussion is all about informed consent: how it is defined, documented and dispensed. What actually requires a signed form, what information that signed form should contain and how much information may be too much information? We then get into a conversation about capacity, competence and how to determine capacity. 

Defining Informed Consent, Capacity, and Competence with Melanie Heniff, MD, JD

Melanie Heniff, MD, JD, is Chicago native and obtained her MD from Rush Medical College in Chicago before completing a combined residency program in Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.   She is triple boarded in Emergency Medicine, General Pediatrics, and Pediatric Emergency Medicine. She recently obtained her JD from Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law and is currently an Associate Professor of Clinical Emergency Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine and partner in Boone County Emergency Medicine.   Today’s discussion is all about informed consent: how it is defined, documented and dispensed. What actually requires a signed form, what information that signed form should contain and how much information may be too much information? We then get into a conversation about capacity, competence and how to determine capacity. 

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Make Money Buying a Vacation Home with Avery Carl of the Short-Term Shop

I’ve been considering investing in real estate, but I’m not really motivated enough or interested enough to move forward. My wife and I put some money in a fund of funds, but with all of the fees, there’s not much money being made. Actually, I don’t think there’s any yet. My wife and I were recently at a vacation destination driving distance from our home and got to thinking… could we get a vacation home here? I got to thinking… could we make money from a vacation home here? I started reading books (listening to books) and listening to podcasts and so I decided to have the queen of short-term rentals on the show to answer our questions. Isn’t it more fun to look at vacation homes than apartment buildings? Avery Carl was named one of Wall Street Journal’s Top 100 and Newsweek’s Top 500 agents in 2020. She and her team at The Short-Term Shop focus exclusively on Vacation Rental and Short-Term Rental Clients, having closed well over 1 billion dollars in real estate sales. Avery has sold over $300 million in Short Term/Vacation Rentals since 2017. An investor herself, with a portfolio of over 100 Doors, Avery specializes in connecting investors with short term rentals with the highest ROI potential, and then training them to manage their short-term rental from their smart phone from anywhere in the world. Talk about a four-hour work week. She is author of the book Short Term Rental Long Term Wealth and host of the Short-Term Show podcast.

Social Entrepreneurship, Melanin & Medicine with Omolara Uwemedimo, MD, MPH

Omolara Thomas Uwemedimo, MD, MPH, is a business development and funding coach for women of color in healthcare and serial entrepreneur, growing 2 companies to multi-six figures in revenue in less than 18 months. During her intrapreneurial career as a pediatrician for over 15 years, researcher & professor for over a decade, she secured $2 million in grant funding and has led inter-professional teams to build and scale healthcare delivery and research programs to achieve health equity for marginalized youth and families. Her work has been defined by a passion for social justice, serving as an advocate and working as a global physician across sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean.    Given her expertise and success as an entrepreneur, Dr. Omolara went on to found Melanin & Medicine, a premier business development & funding coaching company to help support women of color in medicine to secure capital, without incurring debt or diluting equity, to build and grow their own healthcare businesses committed to social impact. To date, Melanin & Medicine has helped over 200 women in medicine across her workshops, courses and programs to pivot into their purpose, re-create their healthcare careers on their own terms, build social impact businesses and live more fulfilled & integrated lives. We talk about how and why she ended up here, why women of color would need to leave medicine, and how she helps physicians build a socially impactful healthcare company that can replace a physician income.

Part 2: When and How to Discuss a Patient’s Weight with Stephanie Sogg, PhD

Back for her second appearance is Dr. Stephanie Sogg, a clinical psychologist from the MGH Weight Center where she has treated patients with obesity at the MGH Weight Center since 2003. One our previous episode, we discussed the importance of language when discussing someone’s weight, so on this episode, we talk about when and how to bring it up. We talk about how body acceptance is actually important to sustained weight loss, although on the surface it may seem like a contradiction. We talk about the influence of sleep, mental health, and when it is time to make recommendations, what actually works. As with most things, it is complicated. Dr. Sogg earned her PhD in clinical psychology from Rutgers University in 1998 and completed a post-doctoral fellowship with Harvard Medical School. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Sogg conducts research on obesity and bariatric surgery, and the intersection between obesity and addiction, and has published widely on obesity and related topics. She is an author of the Boston Interview for Bariatric Surgery, and of the official ASMBS Recommendations for the Pre-Surgical Psychosocial Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Patients. She is the director of the Weight Center rotation for Behavioral Medicine psychology interns and is active in national and international scientific obesity and weight loss surgery societies.